thegreenurbanist:

The Greatest Paper Map of the United States You’ll Ever See: Made by one guy in Oregon.
“Looking at Imus’ big, richly detailed map offers a holistic sense of what America looks like—how cities spread out along rivers, forests give way to plains, and mountains zigzag next to valleys. In Imus’ exuberant view, a map like this might inspire enough geographic curiosity to guide the next generation of students back on course.”
(Image: Dave Imus, Imus Geographics.)

thegreenurbanist:

The Greatest Paper Map of the United States You’ll Ever See: Made by one guy in Oregon.

“Looking at Imus’ big, richly detailed map offers a holistic sense of what America looks like—how cities spread out along rivers, forests give way to plains, and mountains zigzag next to valleys. In Imus’ exuberant view, a map like this might inspire enough geographic curiosity to guide the next generation of students back on course.”

(Image: Dave Imus, Imus Geographics.)

Tags: geography


In a similar spirit, I decided to explore the dimension of the ZIP Code system and see if it has a similar type of fractal dimension. I did this using the wonderful images created by Robert Kosara calledZIPScribbles, which connect the coordinates of sequential ZIP codes (02445 is connected to 02446, 02446 is connected to 02447, and so forth). As you can see below, there is a geographically hierarchical nature to it. ZIP codes divide the population first into states, and then divide into little scribble regions even further, in a self-similar fashion.
So, I set out to measure the fractal nature of the ZIP code system. I used one of the simplest methods, called the box-counting method, which estimates the self-similarity of a shape by looking to see how many boxes in a series of ever-smaller grids are required to cover a shape. Doing this, I was able tocalculate the fractal dimension of the ZIP Code system, using the ZIPScribble: 1.78.
(via Wired: “The Fractal Dimension of ZIP Codes”)

In a similar spirit, I decided to explore the dimension of the ZIP Code system and see if it has a similar type of fractal dimension. I did this using the wonderful images created by Robert Kosara calledZIPScribbles, which connect the coordinates of sequential ZIP codes (02445 is connected to 02446, 02446 is connected to 02447, and so forth). As you can see below, there is a geographically hierarchical nature to it. ZIP codes divide the population first into states, and then divide into little scribble regions even further, in a self-similar fashion.

So, I set out to measure the fractal nature of the ZIP code system. I used one of the simplest methods, called the box-counting method, which estimates the self-similarity of a shape by looking to see how many boxes in a series of ever-smaller grids are required to cover a shape. Doing this, I was able tocalculate the fractal dimension of the ZIP Code system, using the ZIPScribble: 1.78.

(via Wired: “The Fractal Dimension of ZIP Codes”)

(Source: wendfarm)

Tags: geography

Possible origins of the word Iraq

wikiraqi:

Etymology of the word Iraq

  • Deep-rooted derived from the Arabic word Areeq عريق
  • In kurdish it is Eiraq
  • The old Persians prior to Islam called the land Erag
  •  It may be also derived from the Sumerian town of Unug / Uruk ancient Iraq (Biblical Hebrew Erech) .

(Source: newuruk)

bunburybunbury:

You Have No Idea How Big Africa Really Is (But This Map Does)

I’ve seen this picture a dozen times, and it’s never less amazing. We forget just how huge Africa really is.

bunburybunbury:

You Have No Idea How Big Africa Really Is (But This Map Does)

I’ve seen this picture a dozen times, and it’s never less amazing. We forget just how huge Africa really is.

Tags: geography

theastralcity:

Inspired by another post here on Tumblr, I decided to look into the Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong a bit more, it truly was one of the most amazing and terrifying places on earth.  Being slightly smaller than an NFL stadium, the structure was built of 350 smaller interconnected buildings and hosted, at it’s peak, a population density of 5 million people per square mile.

To put those numbers in perspective, this would be like taking the entire population of metro Philadelphia, the 4th largest in the US, and putting it in 1 square mile instead of 1,744.

The area was also largely ungoverned and unregulated.  Factories, apartments, schools, temples, churches, shops, cafes, hotels and almost anything else one could imagine were housed within the structure that never had a full blueprint of it done. Buildings were built onto buildings, expanded, rebuilt, and re-purposed as needed without a central authority of any kind.

Within the structure, natural light was almost non-existent, and an unknown number of miles of jury-rigged wires provided electricity to everything.  Water constantly dripped down to the lower levels from both rain and leaking pipes, while garbage filled every passage.  A constant yellow haze filled the structure and there were never any government safety inspections.

The Kowloon Walled City was demolished in the early 1990s as part of the deal that returned Hong Kong to the Chinese from the British. The entire area is now a park.

I find places like this fascinating, it is just incredible what we, humans, build and live in. This, hive, for lack of a better term, was one of the most interesting structures I’ve yet looked at.

For a documentary shot inside of the Kowloon Walled City, check here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lby9P3ms11w

Facts About Chad: Landlocked

somedayillmakeittochad:

Chad is the third largest (area, not population) landlocked country in the world.

Other landlocked facts:

- Of Landlocked countries, Only Kazakhstan and Mongolia are larger.
- South Sudan is the youngest landlocked country.
- Vatican City is the smallest landlocked country.
- Landlocked countries account for roughly 25% of all countries on earth.

Map of The Landlocked:

Tags: geography

theorypluspractice:


Cartographic Aggression

Wars and border conflicts usually start with gunshots and the sight of enemy tanks rolling down Main Street. But sometimes they start with the redrawing of national borders on a map. Seemingly inconsequential design decisions such as the color an island or whether a border is solid or dashed can easily inflame national pride. Welcome to the world of cartographic aggression.

History is full of such examples of this, from the foreshadowing of military invasion to the ignoring of border disputes. Sometimes the area of conflict is densely populated, rich with material resources, sometimes its the world’s largest sandboxPrior to its 1990 invasion of Kuwait, Saddam Hussein’s Iraq began issuing maps showing its neighbor as its own province. As geographer Harm de Blij notes in his book Why Geography Matters,

“When governments start issuing maps that include the territory of neighbors, get ready. They’re committing cartographic aggression, in part to see whether anyone is paying attention.”

The maps above show the dream (and brief reality) of a Greater Nazi Germany, Japan’s dominance over its neighbors both near and far, and China’s view of Taiwan as a renegade province instead of a sovereign nation. Of course, how these parts of the world are represented depends on where the map was created. I spent more time than I originally anticipated in trying to find maps depicting the aggressor nation’s (certainly a loaded term) point-of-view.

Most maps produced and sold in the U.S. tend to take an impartial view and point out disputed borders and territories whenever possible (a Kashmir with areas claimed by India, Pakistan and China). A typical Indian or Pakistani map of region would show quite a different story. One can learn a lot about a nation’s history, politics and aspirations by reading their maps.

Tags: geography

watersavvy:

Water issues affect us all, from the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels. We are all downstream.

Worldwide, just under 900 million people lack reliable access to safe water that is free from disease and industrial waste. And forty percent do not have access to adequate sanitation facilities. The result is the world’s greatest public health crisis: 4,500 people die every day from waterborne diseases, more than from HIV-AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

A robust economy depends on water. So does a thriving ecosystem. Enter politics, fulcrum of the water issue, weighing the fate of economies against the health of individuals and of the environment as a whole. Balance has been elusive. One fifth of the world’s population lives in areas where water is physically scarce, and a quarter of the population faces shortages due to lack of infrastructure.

As you learn about the water issue, consider how you affect those downstream and how those upstream affect you. We hope you’ll join the conversation — through comments and questions and by uploading your own perspective on the “Your Stories” feature. Pulitzer Center journalists are in the field now covering the water issue as it unfolds, so check back often for new reports.

(via watersavvy)

Tags: geography

geocrusader80:

American Geography According to Twitter 
via @jsznaider @twitaholic
“66% of Twitter’s users don’t provide an actual city as their location, says inboxQ, but thanks to geo-tagged tweets, they were able to figure out where those users actually live.
The resulting image is a map of America as it would appear if Twitter users were allowed to rename the country’s cities.”

geocrusader80:

American Geography According to Twitter 

via @ 

66% of Twitter’s users don’t provide an actual city as their location, says inboxQ, but thanks to geo-tagged tweets, they were able to figure out where those users actually live.

The resulting image is a map of America as it would appear if Twitter users were allowed to rename the country’s cities.”

Tags: geography

JUMPSTART 1ST GRADE

turnerokl:

JUMPSTART 1ST GRADE
In this interactive classroom filled with animation and song. Take field trips to the beach and zoo. Read 50 illustrated stories from 8 interactive books with the help of Ms. Flores your teacher. In all, discover 18 activities teaching geography, science, early math, reading comprehension, music and more! Take Action! Get it immediately!!

Tags: geography